Hallelujah!


 
 
Friday, June 10, 2011
 
Hallelujah!
 
 

I hope you enjoyed

chicken gumbo at Kerrisdale

From: barclay1720@aol.com
To: diane03760@vancouver.ca
Date: Date:Wed, Jun 1, 2011 4:19 pm.

Hi, Diane.

How’s it going?
I hope you enjoyed the sunshine, chicken gumbo, and chatting at the dinner party at Kerrisdale.
Oh yes! You need a nice change from the westend living once in a while.

By the way, I read the “Jane Eyre” book and found out some interesting passages.
And, as usual, I wrote an article about those.
Please click the following link:

“Sexy Jane Eyre”

(June 1, 2011)

…hope you’ll enjoy the entertaining, enlightening yet amusing vide clips in the article.
Have a nice day!

Ciao with a lot of love.

Kato

 

Yes, I love Kerrisdale.

From: diane03760@vancouver.ca
To: barclay1720@aol.com
Date:Thu, Jun 2, 2011 4:49 pm.

Hi Kato,

Wow! I think you’re going to corrupt me kiddo.
Actually, the word ejaculate has several meanings in English.
One, of course, is the sexual connotation of ejaculation, but one of the others means to “exclaim.”
so when Ms. Ingram ejaculated “go”, she was saying it as if in this context.
Similarly, when we jump up suddenly, we call it ejaculation.
Ah, English, such a complicated language.

Glad to know I was missed.
… sure do love Kerrisdale, though highly civilized.
Not as fun as the west end, probably, but very quiet and peaceful.

Love, Diane ~

Diane, you’re uncorruptible.  I know that.

How do you know?

…’cause you know exactly how to handle salicious men. Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha…

Well…, do you really think so?

I’m absolutely sure about it, Diane.

Is that so?  Well…, I most definitely know how to fend off foolish men, but I’m not too sure about romantic men. My life is full of romance, you know?

Is that right?

By the way, Kato, how come you’ve become suddenly religious?

No, not really.

But you’ve recently sent me the following mail.

What a gorgious day it is!

Hallelujah!

From: barclay1720@aol.com
To: diane03760@vancouver.ca
Date: Sun, Jun 5, 2011 3:59 pm.

Hi, Diane.

How’s it going?
What a gorgious day it is! Hallelujah!
You might as well change your mind to take a walk along the seawall, instead of sitting in the library and hitting at the keyboard.
I wouldn’t blame you, Diane.
Certainly, you need a change from time to time.

Right now, I’m at the main library.
It’s half past noon.
I’ve booked the 4 o’clock slot of Number 19 computer, but, since I must write a rather long article offline, I won’t be able to come to Joe Fortes Library before 4 o’clock today.

I’ll miss you, Diane.

I hope you’ll enjoy sunshine on the seawall instead of the hard labor in the library.

By the way, I almost finish the “Jane Eyre” book, which is really a thought-provoking fiction.
I’m really enjoying reading it to my heart’s core.

One passage has really impressed me.
It was told by the 12-year-old Helen when Jane Eyre lamented about her hard life.
That passage goes like this:

Helen Burns

She (Mrs. Reed) has been unkind to you, no doubt; because, you see, she dislikes your cast of charactetr, as Miss Scatcherd does mine: but how minutely you remember all she has done and said to you! What a singularly deep impression her injustice seems to have made on your heart! No ill-usage so brands its record on my feelings. Would you not be happier if you tried to forget her severity, together with the passionate emotions it excited? Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity, or registering wrongs. We are, and must be, one and all, burdened with faults in this world: …

SOURCE: Chapter 6 “Jane Eyre”

How true it is!
Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity!
So I wouldn’t blame you, Diane, even if you would change your mind and take a stroll along the seawall, instead of sitting in the library.
Enjoy the sunshine! Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, …

Well, of course, I’m enjoying staying in the main library.
To show how much I’m enjoying, here is, as usual, an article about Jane Eyre.

Please click the following link:

“Jane Eyre Special”

(June 5, 2011)

…hope you’ll enjoy the entertaining, enlightening yet amusing video clips in the article.
Have a nice day!
Ciao with a lot of love.

Kato

 

Yes, life is too short, Kato

From: diane03760@vancouver.ca
To: barclay1720@aol.com
Date: Date:Mon, Jun 6, 2011 4:35 pm.

Hi Kato,

Hallelujah to you too, kiddo!
Glad to see you’re getting religious.
and you’re right, life is too short ~ far too short ~ to go around nursing animosities.
Guess we’ve both learned a few valuable things on our time on this planet, Kato.
Thanks for sending all of this .. it’s always thought-provoking that’s for sure.

Love, Diane ~

To tell you the truth, Diane, I was impressed by Helen Burns.

Oh, were you?  What impressed you so much?

I viewed the “Jane Eyre” DVD produced by BBC in 1983. Shown in that movie is the following gravestone:

As you see, Helen died at the age of 12.

What a pity!

Yes, it’s terribly sad, isn’t it?  I almost cried to death while watching.

Are you serious, Kato?

I’m dead serious.  What really impressed me is that Helen told Jane like a Mother Teresa of Calcutta:

She (Mrs. Reed) has been unkind to you, no doubt; because, you see, she dislikes your cast of charactetr, as Miss Scatcherd does mine: but how minutely you remember all she has done and said to you! What a singularly deep impression her injustice seems to have made on your heart! No ill-usage so brands its record on my feelings. Would you not be happier if you tried to forget her severity, together with the passionate emotions it excited? Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity, or registering wrongs.

We are, and must be, one and all, burdened with faults in this world: but the time will soon come when, I trust, we shall put them off in putting off our corruptible bodies; when debasement and sin will fall from us with this cumbrous frame of flesh, and only the spark of the spirit will remain,—the impalpable principle of life and thought, pure as when it left the Creator to inspire the creature: whence it came it will return; perhaps again to be communicated to some being higher than man—perhaps to pass through gradations of glory, from the pale human soul to brighten to the seraph!

Surely it will never, on the contrary, be suffered to degenerate from man to fiend? No; I cannnot believe that: I hold another creed; which no one ever taught me, and which I seldom mention; but in which I delight, and to which I cling; for it extends hope to all: it makes Eternity a rest—a mighty home, not a terror and an abyss. Besides, with this creed, I can so clearly distinguish between the criminal and his crime; I can so sincerely forgive the first while I abhor the last: with this creed revenge never worries my heart, degradation never too deeply disgusts me, injustice never crushes me too low: I live in calm, looking to the end.

SOURCE: Chapter 6 “Jane Eyre”

Diane, can you believe that Helen was a mere 12-year-old in the film, and told Jane like a Mother Teresa?

Don’t be silly, Kato. Charlotte Brontë told us throught the mouth of Helen Burns. It’s obvious!

Well, you’re right, Diane.  After all, “Jane Eyre” is a fiction.

Yes, that’s right.

But, you know, Diane…when you write a fiction, characters in the book, or in the movie for that matter, should be easy-to-believe figures. Otherwise, the whole story would become somewhat silly, if not unbelievable.

I think what really matters is whether you’re impressed or not by the plot.  Apparently, you were impressed by what Helen told Jane, weren’t you?

Yes, absolutely, I was.

So, you don’t have to be too picky or critical.  Simply get down to the nitty-gritty of the story. That’s how you appreciate a fiction, I suppose.

You’re right, Diane.  So, you believe in what Helen told Jane, don’t you?

Yes, of course, I do.

So, that’s why I told you that you were uncorruptible.

Oh…?

You see, Diane, even if we have our corruptible bodies, the time will come when debasement and sin will fall from us with this cumbrous frame of flesh, and only the spark of the spirit will remain.

Amazing!…Kato, you’re really getting religious!

By the way, Diane, I’ve also seen the “Jane Eyre” film made in 1944, in which the late Elizabeth Taylor plays as Helen Burns.  Here’s the video clip you might be interested in.

Jane Eyre (1944 film)

Jane Eyre (1944) is a classic film adaptation of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel of the same name, made by 20th Century Fox. It was directed by Robert Stevenson and produced by William Goetz, Kenneth Macgowan, and Orson Welles (uncredited). The screenplay was by John Houseman, Aldous Huxley, Henry Koster, and Robert Stevenson, from the novel by Charlotte Brontë. The music score was by Bernard Herrmann and the cinematography by George Barnes.

The film stars Orson Welles, Joan Fontaine, Margaret O’Brien, Peggy Ann Garner, Sara Allgood, Henry Daniell, Agnes Moorehead, John Sutton, with Betta St. John and Elizabeth Taylor making early, uncredited appearances.

Production notes

The film’s screenplay was based on a radio adaptation of the novel by Orson Welles’ Mercury Theatre on the Air, which John Houseman collaborated on.
The film was acclaimed for its recreation of the Yorkshire Moors. It was actually filmed entirely in Hollywood on a heavily disguised sound stage. The long shadows and heavy fog, which added the air of a Gothic novel lacking in so many remakes, were rumored to have been the brainchild of Orson Welles. He was offered a producer’s credit as thanks for his contribution but declined the offer, believing that a person who is not a director shouldn’t be “just” a producer.
This was the 7th film version of the novel.
It was during his scoring of the film that Bernard Herrmann started working on his opera Wuthering Heights, based on the novel of the same name by Charlotte Brontë’s sister Emily. He quoted some themes from the Jane Eyre film score (and other of his earlier scores) in the opera.
Tagline: A Love Story Every Woman would Die a Thousand Deaths to Live!

Cast

Joan Fontaine – Jane Eyre
Orson Welles – Edward Rochester
Peggy Ann Garner – Jane Eyre as a child
Elizabeth Taylor – Helen Burns (uncredited)
Edith Barrett – Mrs. Alice Fairfax
Agnes Moorehead – Mrs. Reed
Margaret O’Brien – Adele
Sara Allgood – Bessie
Henry Daniell – Henry Brocklehurst
Hillary Brooke – Blanche Ingram

Quotes

The film begins with a voice over from Jane Eyre (an original contribution by the screenwriters):

My name is Jane Eyre… I was born in 1820, a harsh time of change in England. Money and position seemed all that mattered. Charity was a cold and disagreeable word. Religion too often wore a mask of bigotry and cruelty. There was no place for the poor or the unfortunate. I had no father or mother, brother or sister. As a child I lived with my aunt, Mrs. Reed of Gateshead Hall. I do not remember that she ever spoke one kind word to me.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

【Himiko’s Monologue】

Wow! What an amazing video clip!
Whenever I watch the “Jane Eyre” film, I always cry at the scene of Helen Burn’s deathbed.
It is quite sad, isn’t it?

Actually, the eighty pupils at Lowood are subjected to cold rooms, poor meals, and thin clothing.
Many students fall ill when a typhus epidemic strikes.
Jane’s best friend, Helen Burns, dies of consumption in her arms.
When Mr. Brocklehurst’s neglect and dishonesty are discovered, several benefactors erect a new building and conditions at the school improve dramatically.

Anyway, the Jane Eyre drama is one thing; romance is another.
Come to think of it, I’ve never met a decent man in my life.
How come I’m always a loner?
I wish I could meet a nice gentleman at the library in my town as Kato met Diane.
Well, they say, there is a way where there is a will.

Have a nice day!
Bye bye …


“Cleopatra”

“Queen Nefertiti”

“Catherine de Medici”

“Catherine the Great”

“Mata Hari”

“Sidonie Colette”

“Marilyn Monroe”

“Hello Diane!”

“I wish you were there!”

“Jane Eyre”

“Jane Eyre Again”

“Jane Eyre in Vancouver”

“Jane Eyre Special”

“Love & Death of Cleopatra”

“Nice Story”

“Scrumdiddlyumptious”

“Spiritual Work or What?”

“What a coincidence!”

“Wind and Water”

“Yoga and Happiness”

“You’re in a good shape”

ィ~ハァ~♪~!

メチャ面白い、

ためになる関連記事


■ 『きれいになったと感じさせる

下着・ランジェリーを見つけませんか?』

■ 『ちょっと変わった 新しい古代日本史』

■ 『面白くて楽しいレンゲ物語』

■ 『カナダのバーナビーと軽井沢に

別荘を持つことを夢見る小百合さんの物語』

■ 『今すぐに役立つホットな情報』

■ 『 ○ 笑う者には福が来る ○ 』

『夢とロマンの横浜散歩』

『愛とロマンの小包』

『下つきだねって言われて…』

『銀幕の愛』

『パリの空の下で』

『夢の中華パン』

『愛の進化論』

『漫画家と平和(2011年3月6日)』

『漫画家の壁(2011年3月10日)』

『漫画家と奴隷(2011年3月12日)』

『畳の上の水練(2011年3月15日)』

『パール判事とゴーマン(2011年3月18日)』

『軍隊のない国(2011年3月21日)』

『士風と「葉隠」(2011年3月23日)』

『アナクロニズム(2011年3月27日)』

こんにちは。ジューンです。

わたしは「ジェーン エア」を何度も観ました。

いつ観ても感動的です。

主人公ジェーンは孤児になって、

叔母のリード夫人に引き取られて育てられます。

でもリード夫人にもその子供達からも

苛められるのですわ。

やがて、ジェーンは私立学校に送られます。

そこで優しいテンプル先生や

ヘレン・バーンズと出会います。

映画の中の”Slattern”と書かれた板は

へレンが両手をきれいにしていなかったために

他の厳しい先生にとがめられて

罰として首からぶら下げられたのです。

その前に鞭(ムチ)で両手を打たれるのですけれど、

現在なら児童虐待で逆に先生の方が

訴えられてしまうかもしれません。

とにかく、現在の感覚で観ていると

あまりにも厳しい生活に観ているわたしの方こそ

身震いしてしまいます。

そのヘレンは学校内の伝染病にかかって

亡くなってしまうのです。

わずか12年の生涯でした。

本当に可哀想です。

とにかく、涙がこみ上げてくる場面がたくさんあります。

あなたもぜひ観てくださいね。

ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。

コメント / トラックバック4件 to “Hallelujah!”

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  4. Piano Lesson | Denman Blog Says:

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